Selects by Photo Editor Graham Beck from BC basketball’s win over St. Francis today.

Eagles Allow Second Half To Snowball Out Of Control In Fifth-Straight Loss To Harvard

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(Graham Beck/Photo Editor)

By Austin Tedesco, Asst. Sports Editor

When head coach Steve Donahue sees his team shoot almost 60 percent from the field, he expects them to win. Despite the apparent offensive efficiency on Tuesday night, the Boston College men’s basketball fell to Harvard 79-63 in the program’s fifth straight loss to the Crimson.

“It’s hard to imagine you shoot 58 percent and lose by 16 pretty handedly,” Donahue said. “There’s a mental toughness side on both sides of the ball that they had and we didn’t. That was, I’m sure, apparent to everybody. In particular, when they pressured us – even though we were scoring we were never understanding and staying poised and confident in our offense. But when we pressured them they just moved like clockwork to the next thing. And like I said it’s kind of mind-boggling to put up those kinds of numbers and lose pretty handedly.”

Ryan Anderson opened the game by scoring 11 of the Eagles first 13 points and it looked as though the Crimson didn’t have an answer for the BC forward, but after the first five minutes his offense began to fade.

“Part of our offense is everyone moves and everyone touches the ball,” said freshman guard Joe Rahon. “Looking back we probably should’ve tried to make more of an effort on the court to try to get it to him when he was hot, but they did do a good job of keying on him. When we were driving they were shading him a little bit more than they did at the start of the game, but looking back we probably should’ve tried to ride him a little more there.”

BC kept the game in reach until the second half, when Harvard went on a run that the Eagles couldn’t match.

“The Achilles’ heel for us is that we allow a play that just happened to snowball to the next play, and it happens in all facets of basketball,” Donahue said. “It’s something that I can’t tell you how many times we talk about it, we harp on it, and we show it to them on film.”

The Harvard players methodically attacked the BC defense on their way to tying their highest point total of the season so far. They made BC defend for the whole shot-clock before finally finding a clean look that consistently fell through the net.

“That’s the two hardest things to do in basketball,” Donahue said. “Is to push it early on and stop them, and then to have the poise and toughness and confidence at the end of the shot clock, and they exploited both ends of that.”

On the offensive end, BC was flustered by the Harvard pressure which broke the rhythm of the motion offense.

“They did a great job of pressuring us and trying to deny easy swing passes,” Rahon said. “I think we didn’t handle it as well as we needed to. We knew they were going to do it. We knew it was coming and we were trying to just get backdoor cuts, get sharp cuts, and move the ball, but they did a good job of taking us out of our rhythm there for a little bit, and we were never really able to turn it around and get over the hump.”

Donahue wouldn’t chalk up the loss to experience, though.

“Can’t say experience anymore,” Donahue said. “I’m done with that. The defense was poor. It’s got to get better. We’ll work at it, but the defense was really poor.”

Although many of the Eagles looked out of sync and worn down during the second half, Donahue said it wasn’t an issue with effort.

“It’s not effort,” Donahue said. “It isn’t. We have to, my staff and myself, get them playing at a certain high level, consistently, all the time, and not missing a beat. It appears at time that it’s effort, but I just think it’s the mental toughness part of it that the guys don’t have the ability to fight through. These guys will continue to get better at it, we’ll continue to bring people into this program that understand it, and we’ll build a culture similar to what we did at Cornell and similar to what Harvard has – but to say they’re not trying? No, they try. They try really hard.”

His players need to be more mentally tough, and he says that will come through failures like this as he continues to build the program.

“I love these guys, as I say all the time,” Donahue said. “I have great confidence that they’ll get it and we’re going to work extremely hard to do it. Unfortunately, and I know I sound like a broken record, but we’re going to have failures here. We’re going to have some extreme frustration, but that to me is the only way you can be successful.”

Freshmen Lead Eagles Past Penn State Pressure

(Photo by Graham Beck/Heights Editor)

By Steven Principi, Heights Staff

In its first true road win since the spring of 2011, the Boston College men’s basketball team managed to get back on track after an ugly loss to Bryant with a 73-61 win over Penn State in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge on Wednesday night in State College. 

The Eagles were led by freshmen guards Olivier Hanlan and Joe Rahon on the offensive end and also received some solid bench play from Lonnie Jackson and Andrew Van Nest. 

Both teams started off slow from the field in the first half, but BC managed to find its stroke first. A Jackson three and a dunk by Ryan Anderson opened up a 10-2 lead early on before PSU began making  shots. While neither team played at its best on offense, the first half turned into a back and forth affair.  Van Nest made a late 3-pointer to give the Eagles a 10-point lead, but the Nittany Lions hit one of their own just before the buzzer and BC went into the break leading 31-24.  Head coach Steve Donahue was pleased with his team’s effort in the first half and spoke about the Eagles’ high level of intensity.

“I thought we came out with the right mindset,” Donahue said. “We had the energy level that you need to compete and I think that’s something that hasn’t been consistent with us this year. I thought we did a great job of really coming out and playing hard, playing physical, and playing with great passion.”

The Eagles came out hot in the second half and looked ready to bury PSU. Hanlan, Rahon, and Jackson led the offense for BC, who saw its lead grow as high as 20 points with just over five minutes to play.

The Eagles then fell victim to Penn State’s full court press and struggled to move the ball past half court. Several turnovers and some timely shooting from the Nittany Lions cut the lead to as little as three in just more than two minutes.  It was a concerning stretch for the BC, who saw a number of games get out of hand last season due to similar struggles. Donahue said the late run was concerning, but he appreciated the way his team responded.

“I think that was a lot of crazy things that happened all at once,” Donahue said. “Obviously we didn’t handle the pressure, but they made shots and got fouled a lot. I was impressed because when they cut it to three, there were still three minutes left in the game. We were able to regain our composure and go on another run. Obviously we’re disappointed it got that way, but on the road when that happens with three minutes left, you’re concerned you’re not going to recover at all.”

Hanlan came to the rescue for BC. Time after time he managed to get to the basket, driving by Penn State’s defense with ease on consecutive possessions. With the lead at three, Hanlan drove to the basket and made a layup while being fouled, pushing the lead back up to six. On the next possession, he drew three defenders towards him and hit a wide open Van Nest for an easy dunk.  From there, he and Rahon managed to control the ball much better and hit their free throws to put the game away.  Donahue was particularly impressed with the play of his two freshmen.

“I think they’re going to have to be the guys who have to do it,” Donahue said. “I think they’ve shown already early in their career that they’re guys we can rely on to make good decisions and handle the ball. And they’ll keep getting better and their decision making isn’t perfect, but it’s pretty impressive what they’re doing early.”