I think we all have challenges at every program to sell playing time and opportunities, but you know what I’m pretty honest with every kid—and this is nothing against the guys who are here. I told these guys that no one earned the starts this year. It’s not like they beat out a sophomore or junior or senior who had been playing. Essentially, someone had to play, and that’s where the challenges are. I told them that everyone coming in here, I’m trying to get guys that will help us win in the ACC, so they’re probably going to want your job. Your responsibility is to get better and better, so personally you don’t lose your job if you’re playing already. You’re trying as a sub to beat those guys out, and then all of us are trying to get better. I think it’s actually, if I’m honest with a guy, I’m saying that no one’s secured this spot. I may say in two years, you know, returning now look at this kid’s freshman and sophomore years and now he’s our junior, and at the same time I’m recruiting a guy at the same position, that’s a lot harder. Right now, I think there are still great opportunities, and I said that to our guys. That’s the challenge. You’ve got to continue to get better. No one really beat someone out and earned it this year. You’re going to have to do that from now on. — Men’s basketball head coach Steve Donahue on if the number of players in the rising sophomore class make recruiting more challenging. Check out the full interview in tomorrow’s issue of The Heights.
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